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Archive for the ‘Camera Technology’ Category

Wi Fi Camera Wireless Wi Fi SD Card

September 22nd, 2014 Comments off

Wifi_Card

Back in 2008 we posted a review of the 2gb Eye-Fi card after running it through the paces on a trip to NY: http://www.foto-tech.com/eye-fi-wireless-sd-card/. Today there are many very affordable ($30) options for Wi Fi Cards and devices that attach to cameras.  A few cameras also have built in Wi Fi transmitters and we expect most cameras will have built in Wi Fi in the coming years. Transend and Mono Price make systems in addition to Eye-Fi and card sizes range from 8gb-128gb. It’s really a miracle of micro tech that these companies can fit all that into an SD card.

Why are Wi Fi Camera solution of such interest to the editors of Foto-Tech?
We believe that the future of Camera Technology is the camera with GPS & Transmitter included.  The GPS helps journalist and documentarians of all types with what, WHERE, when, why and how and the transmitter is essential for utilizing the imagery.

Professionally, these Wi-Fi cards are very useful if the camera you use has two card slots.  We record raw files to a CF card and transmit Jpeg files using a Wi Fi SD card in the other slot.  The Jpegs are for quick previews and a Non tethered workflow.  Our camera transmits Jpeg files to a folder that Lightroom is watching.  Any adjustment we make to these jpg files in Lightroom are later synced to the RAW files.  For our studio, it’s an efficient system  that brakes the tether cord and streamlines our workflow.

Personally, We use the same system for all our point and shoot cameras that the family uses.  When the camera comes in contact with a Wi Fi hotspot after taking pictures, the card transmits the images to our distribution system.  The system starts with Adobe Lightoom and usually ends with Facebook and SmugMug family galleries.

Mono Price Wi-Fi® microSD™ Adapter

Add Wi-Fi® file transfer ability to your existing SDHC™ compatible digital camera using this Wi-Fi microSD™ Adapter from Monoprice!

This adapter is in the form of the popular full-sized SD™ card and features a built-in 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi radio. The radio is powered by the camera (or other device it is inserted into), has a maximum indoor range from 16 ~ 55 feet, and has a maximum outdoor range from about 82 ~ 164 feet. The adapter is a stand-alone wireless hotspot and requires no other networking or applications to function.

This adapter requires an SDHC compatible full-sized SD card slot on your camera. It uses any microSD card up to 32GB capacity (not included), though class 10 cards are recommended if video is to be captured. Connecting to the adapter is as simple as selecting the adapter for your wireless network, then opening up a browser. Up to 5 users can simultaneously access the card to browse or download the contents.

This adapter was reviewed by c|net on June 19, 2014. You can read what they had to say about by clicking on this link.

Upgrading Photo Technology

December 11th, 2008 1 comment

” I’ve loved more cameras than women, but I love women more than cameras.”
photographers_nikon_fe2

I’ve been working out some theories on the most practical way to upgrade technology. Cameras, computer hardware, and software technology move at an alarming rate. The question is: when does it make financial and practical sense to upgrade? There are considerations of implementation and cost involved. Here I will outline these considerations and my theories and strategies.
Moore’s Law describes a long-term trend in computer hardware where capacity of circuitry doubles every 24 months. These same principles can be applied to almost all technologies, though the timing is different for every technology and situation. Technology upgrade theory is all about cost, implementation, and gain. Developing a good strategy is dependent on the nature of the technology and that must be studied carefully.

Know the Technology and know the habits and schedules of the manufacturers of that technology.
Example #1 Adobe is on an 18Month upgrade cycle: they allow you to skip versions and still get upgrade pricing: and their upgrades are usually major.
Example #2 Nikon usually upgrades the flagship models six-nine months before the top prosumer models. The top of the line prosumer cameras usually have many of the desirable features of the Flagship model at 40% of the price. Nikon is notoriously slow in getting their announced cameras to market. Read more…

Photography Hand Trucks and Carts

May 19th, 2008 Comments off


My last post on camera bag technology and transporting your gear did not include lighting gear. This post is primarily for Pros who travel with lighting.

Case technology for transporting lighting really hasn’t really changed that much. Lights have gotten smaller and lighter, but this hasn’t change the cases. It’s just a matter of getting the right size and padding. Many newer cases come with wheels and that’s a noteworthy addition.

The four biggest manufactures are Lightware, Tenba, Pelican, and Haliburton.

Size matters: Getting the right size and weight for air travel is tricky. Sometimes it’s just best to rent gear near your destination when you travel by air. I like to hire local assistants who own lights or can get their hands on some. I’ll pay big bucks for someone who knows the location, can get the lighting, and can pick me up at the airport. What I save on rental cars, taxis, and baggage charges can pay for an assistant. Read more…

Camera Bag Technology

May 15th, 2008 Comments off


The right method of traveling your gear is essential. Careful consideration of the way the gear is transported is often overlooked. Camera gear has changed, so the bags and cases have changed as well. Some of the new bag technology is really innovative and can make a big difference in the way you work with the equipment. Backpacks, slings, and holsters are in are replacing shoulder bags. My back welcomes these changes! Really nice Modular Systems are also coming onto the market.

Depending on the amount of gear you own, and what you do with it, I recommend owning at least three camera bags:
#1.) The largest bag that will still fit the domestic travel carry on regulation: I use the Tenba Shootout backpack shown above for this bag. It just barely fit’s into the overhead of larger planes. The shootout is a really well thought out backpack and I highly recommend it.

#2.) A medium bag that will carry just one camera body, a flash and a couple of lenses: I use the Tamrac Velocity 9 shown below which is a sling style. I love the sling style and find the Velocity 9 to be an comfortable and accessible.

#3.) A holster bag that carries only one camera and one lens: It’s nice to be able to take just the bare essentials on some shoots. Read more…